Flynn McGarry began a dinner club out of his parents’ home at age eleven and now, at the formative age of sixteen, he’s authoritatively moved out. “It’s a perma pop-up—I’m not certain what to call it, so we imagined another term,” McGarry says of his three-day-a-week, twelve-seat chef’s table space named Eureka, opening this Saturday in New York. Reservations are ticketed, and his fourteen-course tasting menu costs $160 a head.


Designing another expression for his idea restaurant shouldn’t come as a stun to the individuals who have been following his whirlwind career. In March 2014, McGarry was profiled in The New York Times Magazine cover story, in which the author noticed, “McGarry’s consequent arrangement is to move to New York at seventeen, work at Eleven Madison Park or some place like it for a year, possibly eighteen months, and after that begin deal with his restaurant by nineteen.” Timing, it appears for McGarry, truly isn’t of the essence. He’s essentially going with the flow, grabbing hold of the opportunities that have introduced themselves and provocatively reevaluating the way we experience fine dining. “I cook and whatever remains of it simply sort of happens,” he says.


Many have chastised him for being excessively youthful or for making an industry’s joke—previous Louro chef David Santos as of late said that when individuals call McGarry a chef, it outrages him. Call him a genius or a joke, the one obvious thing about McGarry is that he’s energetic about what he does. He’s interned at Michelin-starred restaurants like Alinea and shadowed chefs like Eleven Madison Park’s Daniel Humm. This late spring he flew out to Europe to learn from profoundly regarded culinary bosses at spots like Geranium in Copenhagen and Maaemo in Oslo. For Eureka, McGarry will serve dishes roused by his experiences abroad, additionally his signature plates like peanut Ritz crackers with foie gras terrine and sour cherry compote.

He’s enchanting and sharp, with a flawlessly swooped mop of hair and slick fashion sense reminiscent of everybody’s high school crush. What’s more, that is only it: On the outside he’s a customary young person who likes McDonald’s, watching movies, and going to shows. Within, he’s a splendid, driven child who may very well be worth more than a few Michelin stars.