I am addicted To You - ADORABLE PICTURES OF CINDY CRAWFORD AS A LITTLE GIRL 5

ADORABLE PICTURES OF CINDY CRAWFORD AS A LITTLE GIRL

 

 

 

 

This month, Cindy Crawford publishes Becoming €‹, a lavish gathering of photos that span her profession, matched with forthright, personal essays on working with some of fashion’s most extremely popular photographers: Richard Avedon, Irving Penn, Helmut Newton and many others. Be that as it may, before she appeared before their lenses, she was just a little girl experiencing childhood in the Midwest. Here, in an excerpt from her new book, she describes some of the earliest recollections that persuaded her there may be something bigger beyond the cornfields.

 

 

On Being a Small Town Girl:

This is what you have to think about where I came from. I was born in DeKalb, Illinois, a small town sixty miles west of Chicago. I was brought up the second oldest child of three girls and a baby boy, in a run of the mill, all-American, blue-collar family. My dad was a mechanical engineer, electrician, and glazier. My mom, married and pregnant at sixteen, was a housewife and later worked in a doctor’s office. My grandparents, close relatives, and cousins lived nearby, which made our group feel like a more extended family. We played softball outside until dark and never locked our entryways. We had backyard grills and Fourth of July parades. It was an awesome approach to grow up.

 

On Moving Beyond the Small Town:

I adored my small-town childhood. Yet I knew, and still, after all that, that some way or another my way would take me beyond the solaces of that well known place. For some time I wanted to be a nuclear physicist, and later I dreamed for turning into the first woman president €”the two greatest employments I could envision. My fourth-grade student teacher named me “Future Miss America,” keeping in mind that wasn’t generally a role I aspired to, the thought that somebody outside my family could dream so enormous for me was a revelation. It opened up my mind to potential possibilities far beyond DeKalb.